Comment:From Markyate to Marshalswick “village”, we loved The Best House in Town

PUBLISHED: 11:40 27 February 2019 | UPDATED: 11:40 27 February 2019

Pete Williamson and Alison Berneye's St Albans terrace was one of the contenders on The Best House in Town. Picture: DANNY LOO

Pete Williamson and Alison Berneye's St Albans terrace was one of the contenders on The Best House in Town. Picture: DANNY LOO

©2019 Archant

So what did we all think of The Best House in Town?

It’s been the main topic of conversation on local social media over the last week or so, and opinion’s been broadly mixed on whether it was a. ultimate nosy neighbour TV or b. a bit rubbish.

I’m team a. all the way. I’ve loved seeing so many amazing local homes on display, not to mention the 12 lots of brave homeowners willing to allow the cameras and judges across their thresholds and into all of our living rooms.

As someone who generally favours period homes, with their coving, cornicing and associated damp and decay, I loved the town centre semi and trio of terraces.

However, the show has opened my eyes to the magic of a more modern renovation, and what can be achieved in an uninspiring shell with a bit of imagination (and money). Winner Chrissie transformed an unspectacular 70s detached house into something very special indeed, with the kind of kitchen/diner that dreams are made of. Original brick walls are nothing to me now I’ve seen that.

But enough about the houses: what we really need to discuss is the geography.

There’s been much debate on whether St Albans should mean St Albans, or if it’s fine to include homes from anywhere with an AL postcode –Welwyn, Markyate and Gustard Wood, for example.

I’m assuming the production team weren’t able to garner enough interest from St Albans itself, but given the calibre of home that was needed to make such a show a success, it makes sense for them to have broadened the net a little. As for their classification of Marshalswick as a “village”, and the clip of the judges’ van narrowly missing a road marked ‘Scarborough’, it’s fair to say there were a few editing issues that might have been addressed.

Ultimately, I’ve thoroughly enjoyed the show and wish the St Albans week could have lasted forever (which, if true, would have eventually seen the Scarborough area of St Albans receiving a visit.)


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