St Albans pub installs appliances to help environment

PUBLISHED: 07:00 10 July 2018 | UPDATED: 09:16 10 July 2018

Christo Tafelli with the new appliances. Picture: Loudbird PR

Christo Tafelli with the new appliances. Picture: Loudbird PR

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Ye Olde Fighting Cocks pub in St Albans has invested in three machines to help reduce its carbon footprint.

Christo Tafelli with the new appliances. Picture: Loudbird PRChristo Tafelli with the new appliances. Picture: Loudbird PR

The pub spent £30,000 on an LFC food digester, a glass crusher and a small cardboard bailer. The food digester offers a way of disposing waste food, and can digest both raw and cooked foods without using any chemicals.

The carboard bailer reduces the need for frequent collections and is taken to a local depot for recycling, which will ultimately divert from landfill. Similarly, the glass crusher will reduce the need for collection by four times, crushing the glass to a size which can still be sorted by colour and turned back into bottles.

Installing these appliances will help the pub reduce its carbon footprint in excess of 100 tonnes each year.

Landlord Christo Tofalli said: “The installation of these three machines has been life-changing for our recycling processes at the pub and the investment is worth every penny.”

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