‘Walk for water’ in St Albans forest to raise money for charity

PUBLISHED: 15:20 25 September 2018

Phillip Nixon from Oxfam St Albans Group with Mayor Rosemary Farmerl. Picture: Hilary Tyrrell

Phillip Nixon from Oxfam St Albans Group with Mayor Rosemary Farmerl. Picture: Hilary Tyrrell

Archant

Oxfam in St Albans is taking part in a ‘walk for water’ to help bring clean water and sanitation to communities around the world.

From left to right: Sue Parkyn, Sue Cockell, Rushna Miah, Mayor Rosemary Farmer, Zia Kiani, Phillip Nixon and Hilary Tyrrell. Picture: Hilary TyrrellFrom left to right: Sue Parkyn, Sue Cockell, Rushna Miah, Mayor Rosemary Farmer, Zia Kiani, Phillip Nixon and Hilary Tyrrell. Picture: Hilary Tyrrell

St Albans mayor Rosemary Farmer met with members of Oxfam St Albans Group and HAWA (Herts Asian Women’s Association) to pledge support for the project. The walk will be held at Heartwood Forest on Saturday, September 29 and features a range of distances to suit everyone, ranging between three and 20 miles.

There is no fee for taking part but walkers make a donation to help Oxfam reach its £6,000 fundraising target. Most walks will start between 10 and 11am, but the shortest route can be started up to 3pm.

Cllr Farmer said: “I’m delighted to support this event which can help Oxfam save so many lives. A huge thank you to all the volunteers who make the walk possible. I look forward to as many local people as possible joining me on the day.”

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