Visitors from German twin town welcomed to St Albans

PUBLISHED: 08:01 12 July 2018 | UPDATED: 08:01 12 July 2018

Mayor cllr Rosemary Farmer with members of the delegation and the St Albans Worms partnership.

Mayor cllr Rosemary Farmer with members of the delegation and the St Albans Worms partnership.

Archant

A delegation from St Albans’ twin city of Worms was welcomed by the mayor last week.

Mayor cllr Rosemary Farmer with members of the delegation and the St Albans Worms partnership.Mayor cllr Rosemary Farmer with members of the delegation and the St Albans Worms partnership.

Mayor cllr Rosemary Farmer welcomed the visitors at St Albans district council offices before giving them a tour of St Albans Museum and Gallery.

Delegates from St Albans have previously visited Worms, which is one of the oldest cities in Germany and lies on the banks of the river Rhine, south of Frankfurt. It is a cathedral city, like St Albans, with Celtic and Roman heritage and a historic city centre with architecture dating back to the medieval period.

The trip was organised by the St Albans Worms Partnership, which celebrated 50 years of twinning in 2007.

Mayor Rosemary Farmer said: “It was wonderful to welcome so many visitors to historic St Albans from our twin city of Worms. Twinning visits such as these help promote St Albans overseas as a visitor destination.”

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I should probably have taken the hint! Walking out into the garden recently an unprecedented flock of thirty or more crows raucously greeted me from the treetops at the bottom of my garden. Cawing and croaking these big, black birds clung clumsily to the top most branches and twigs, jostling and flapping to stay balanced in a constant flurry of feathers. There is always something ominous about crows – they are after all carrion crows, the vultures of the bird world – always watching for scraps and weakness that might mean their next meal.

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