Remembering Morris Minor Owners Club treasurer and St Albans stalwart

Don Loveday.

Don Loveday. - Credit: Debbie Jeater

A procession of Morris Minors followed a St Albans stalwart on his final journey to West Herts Crematorium.

Donald Richard Loveday was born on March 6 1934 in Tottenham to James and Florence ‘Flossie’ Loveday.

He was evacuated during the war to Cambridge with his twin sisters Pat and Dot and ran away several times after being bullied.

Donwent to Downhills Central School in Tottenham, but was not a great scholar and left without any exams.

He started an apprenticeship in the printing firm Charles Phipps in West Green Road, Tottenham, and later for Odhams and The Hornsey Journal before finally working for Rupert Murdoch at News International on The Sun and The News of the World, during which time he campaigned tirelessly with his union colleagues on picket lines at Wapping and all over the country, which resulted in him being arrested and kept in a police cell overnight.


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His apprenticeship was interrupted by National Service in June 1954, taking leave to marry Iris May Naldrett on July 9 1955 who he met at his local youth club, where they both were keen cyclists completing the London to Brighton run.

After losing his job in the print industry he started various businesses in carpentry including Spicecraft where he produced spiceracks for Harrods and latterly DL Decorating where his services were much sought after!

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He developed a passion for Morris Minor cars and lovingly restored the family Morris Minor Traveller over several years, attending rallies and shows all over the country winning numerous awards.

As treasurer of the MMOC (Morris Minor Owners Club) he helped to raise thousands for various charities they supported including Rennie Grove in St Albans and the National Kidney Care Foundation.

Don was a keen Spurs supporter and loved cricket and could often be found on a Sunday afternoon sitting on Harpenden Common watching the game and listening to Aggers on Test Match Special at the same time!

His daughter Debbie said: "He was a man of principle and always stood up for what was right and fair. He was kind, funny and always had time for everyone. He had a fabulous quality which enabled him to always make people feel at ease and was loved by all he met along his way.

"Of the nearly 90 sympathy cards we received many of them described him as a true gentleman and a legend - he was my dad so he was everything to me but meant so much to so many along the way and everyone will miss him and his smile."

He passed away on August 8.

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