St Albans teenager paints scene on successful Christmas cards

PUBLISHED: 17:00 18 November 2018 | UPDATED: 10:25 19 November 2018

Georgia Sweeny with her Christmas card designs, which are being sold in the St Albans Museum + Gallery. Picture: Phyllis Sweeny

Georgia Sweeny with her Christmas card designs, which are being sold in the St Albans Museum + Gallery. Picture: Phyllis Sweeny

Archant

A teenager who painted an iconic St Albans landmark has created popular Christmas cards of the designs.

Georgia Sweeny's Christmas card design, which are being sold in the St Albans Museum + Gallery. Picture: Phyllis SweenyGeorgia Sweeny's Christmas card design, which are being sold in the St Albans Museum + Gallery. Picture: Phyllis Sweeny

Aspiring artist Georgia Sweeny created the cards using a watercolour scene she painted of the facade of St Albans Museum + Gallery, and they have been selling successfully in the museum’s gift shop.

The 16-year-old is using the profits to prepare for university by attending summer art school at either the University of the Arts London or Kingston University London.

She said: “It is really exciting because I thought it was really nice to have something I had done in a shop that is very St Albans, for and about the city.

“I like the idea of telling and expressing different stories of different lives and different places. One of the things I enjoy about my art is being able to create something for my own enjoyment that other people can appreciate as well.”

Georgia Sweeny's previous Christmas card design, which won a competition at St Albans High School for Girls. Picture: Phyllis SweenyGeorgia Sweeny's previous Christmas card design, which won a competition at St Albans High School for Girls. Picture: Phyllis Sweeny

Georgia got the idea after winning a Christmas card competition, of a different design, at St Albans High School for Girls last year.

With the help of Macpro Design and Print on Pickford Road, she made that earlier scene, also of St Albans Museum + Gallery, into cards to fundraise £4,000 for a charity expedition to Malawi.

Her mum, Phyllis Sweeny, said: “I am bursting with pride. Lots of people have put really nice comments on Facebook and when she delivers them to people, they have been so lovely. It’s so nice for her and I am really hoping that she gets to do what she wants to do at university.

“She has been asked by quite a few people to do a calendar of a few locations but with doing her A-Levels there is only so much she can do.”

Georgia Sweeny's Christmas card designs, which are being sold in the St Albans Museum + Gallery. Picture: Phyllis Sweeny
Georgia Sweeny's Christmas card designs, which are being sold in the St Albans Museum + Gallery. Picture: Phyllis Sweeny

Phyllis added: “She is learning all about costs and marketing and business and other skills at the moment too.”

Although this work is in watercolour, Georgia enjoys sketching in ink and is interested in pursuing a career in illustration or animation.

St Albans district council portfolio holder for sports and culture, Annie Brewster, said Georgia is clearly very gifted: “She has captured both the building and the surrounding street scene brilliantly. I can see her pursuing a very successful career in art and I sincerely hope she will go on to have her own exhibition at the Museum + Gallery one day.”

See more of Georgia’s work on Instagram @GeorgiaSweeny

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