Religious groups in St Albans promote peace in the Middle East

PUBLISHED: 15:25 20 November 2018 | UPDATED: 15:26 20 November 2018

The 'Solutions Not Sides' event in St Albans promoted peace between Israel and Palestine. Picture: SAMS

The 'Solutions Not Sides' event in St Albans promoted peace between Israel and Palestine. Picture: SAMS

Archant

Religious groups in St Albans came together to discuss the possibility of peace between Israel and Palestine.

The 'Solutions Not Sides' event in St Albans promoted peace between Israel and Palestine. Picture: SAMSThe 'Solutions Not Sides' event in St Albans promoted peace between Israel and Palestine. Picture: SAMS

The ‘Solutions Not Sides’ event was held at The Methodist Church in Hatfield Road, with two peace activists, one from Israel and one from Palestine, describing their experiences of the conflict and their hopes of peace in the future.

The event was hosted by both Reverend Rosemary Fletcher and Rabbi Adam Zagoria-Moffet. One of the speakers commented: “It seems obvious, but being kind and truly listening to each other’s narratives rather than demonising one another is the place to begin. It is from events and dialogue like this, both outside of Israel and Palestine as well as within that, a sense of trust can begin to merge, and from trust peaceful solutions can be found.”

The event was supported by the Board of Deputies for British Jews and Churches Together in Britain and Ireland.

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