St Albans garden centre encouraging kids to become a bee’s best friend

PUBLISHED: 17:00 19 May 2017

Three year old Sophie Fern meets Barry B Benson from the Bee Movie at Notcutts in Tunbridge Wells


Credit: Simon Dack / Vervate

Three year old Sophie Fern meets Barry B Benson from the Bee Movie at Notcutts in Tunbridge Wells Credit: Simon Dack / Vervate

www.vervate.com 01273275162 07973677017

Notcutts garden centre in St Albans is encouraging children to spend their half term planting to attract bees and other wildlife.

With the help of Barry B Benson from the Bee Movie, kids can go on a special activity trail for free, where they will learn more about attracting wildlife.

The trail will be open throughout the May half-term holiday.

Notcutts’centre manager, Chris Holt, said: “Gardening is a fantastic hobby and we are buzzing with excitement to share our bee facts with children this half term.

“Creating a little space for bees in the garden is easy to do and can make a difference to our bee populations.”

As well as teaching visitors more about bees, the trail will also include a ‘Kids Go Free’ voucher to ‘DreamWorks Tours: Shrek’s Adventure’ in London.

The trail will be open between Saturday, May 27 and Sunday, June 4 at Notcutts St Albans.

To find out more, visit www.notcutts.co.uk

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CountryPhile

I should probably have taken the hint! Walking out into the garden recently an unprecedented flock of thirty or more crows raucously greeted me from the treetops at the bottom of my garden. Cawing and croaking these big, black birds clung clumsily to the top most branches and twigs, jostling and flapping to stay balanced in a constant flurry of feathers. There is always something ominous about crows – they are after all carrion crows, the vultures of the bird world – always watching for scraps and weakness that might mean their next meal.

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