St Albans cubs get crafty to support national Yellow Fish campaign

PUBLISHED: 15:18 04 October 2018 | UPDATED: 15:18 04 October 2018

The First Park Street cubs painted Yellow Fish onto kerbs around St Albans for the Environment Agency campaign. Picture: First Park Street Scouts cub pack

The First Park Street cubs painted Yellow Fish onto kerbs around St Albans for the Environment Agency campaign. Picture: First Park Street Scouts cub pack

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Cubs have painted yellow fish on drains around St Albans as part of a campaign about water pollution.

The First Park Street cubs painted Yellow Fish onto kerbs around St Albans for the Environment Agency campaign. Picture: First Park Street Scouts cub packThe First Park Street cubs painted Yellow Fish onto kerbs around St Albans for the Environment Agency campaign. Picture: First Park Street Scouts cub pack

Children from the First Park Street Scouts Cub pack have been stencilling yellow fish next to water grills in Park Street to remind everyone that any waste poured into the drain will flow directly to the nearest stream, river, lake, or canal and harm the wildlife there.

Pipes from household toilets, showers, sinks, dishwashers, and washing machines are taken to a separate foul water passage to be treated.

This Yellow Fish project is a national campaign by the Environment Agency with the motto Only Rain Down The Drain.

Unwanted substances include razors, medicines, cotton buds, nappies, sanitary items, medicines, pet waste, engine or cooking oil, paint, chemicals, detergents, and litter.

The First Park Street cubs painted Yellow Fish onto kerbs around St Albans for the Environment Agency campaign. Picture: First Park Street Scouts cub packThe First Park Street cubs painted Yellow Fish onto kerbs around St Albans for the Environment Agency campaign. Picture: First Park Street Scouts cub pack

One of the First Park Street Scout Cub leaders, Ajanta Hilton, said: “This project was a great experience for the Cubs.

“They were excitedly telling passers-by what they were doing and why, and local residents said they were very impressed with the Cubs’ attitude.

“It’s brilliant the Cubs are so enthusiastic about this environmental issue – and this project can really impact on people locally – as it alerts them not to pour oils, fats or anything else down the drain!”

For every one litre of oil poured into a drainage pipe, one million litres of drinking water is polluted.

The Cubs, who were working towards their Community Impact badges, also handed out information flyers about the campaign.

Chair of Sustainable St Albans, Catherine Ross said: “Our mission is about building a sustainable district for generations to come, so I was delighted to hear about the Yellow Fish project.

“It is so rewarding to see that the Cubs are becoming aware and want to do something practical to help the environment that they will grow up in.”

The First Park Street Cubs have two active groups, alongside two Beaver colonies and one Scout troop. They welcome any boy or girl living in Park Street or How Wood.

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CountryPhile

I should probably have taken the hint! Walking out into the garden recently an unprecedented flock of thirty or more crows raucously greeted me from the treetops at the bottom of my garden. Cawing and croaking these big, black birds clung clumsily to the top most branches and twigs, jostling and flapping to stay balanced in a constant flurry of feathers. There is always something ominous about crows – they are after all carrion crows, the vultures of the bird world – always watching for scraps and weakness that might mean their next meal.

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