Rescued horse in Sandridge stars in Netflix drama The Crown

PUBLISHED: 12:00 05 December 2016

He was covered in sores when Danielle found him and has since been nursed back to health.

He was covered in sores when Danielle found him and has since been nursed back to health.

Archant

Five years after being rescued, an ex-racehorse which can no longer be ridden has appeared in a popular Netflix show.

Danielle Sargeson, who lives in Sandridge, visited a yard near Hemel Hempstead five years ago in search of a young horse to train.

When she was there she discovered a horse covered in sores that had been brought over from Ireland “as part of a job lot”.

After much consideration, she agreed to purchase the horse, who has now gone on to appear in the acclaimed Netflix drama, The Crown, which follows the political rivalries and romance of Queen Elizabeth II during her reign.

Danielle said: “It was really sad as he had sores all over his body, you could see all of his ribs and bones and he had part of his foot missing.

“He was in such a poor state that I initially said no to buying him as I didn’t want to spend my money on something that could potentially have a lot of problems.”

Danielle said she felt that she “couldn’t leave him there” and so she decided to buy him and he was later delivered to Sandridgebury Stables, just off Sandridgebury Lane in St Albans.

The horse, whose official name is The Brazilian, has a history of racing in Ireland but following his health problem he is now unable to be ridden.

Danielle, who calls him Quid as he had “cost a lot to be a pet”, heard about the role in the programme through a friend.

Nine-year-old Quid has now appeared in a selection of episodes of The Crown as the Queen’s racehorse Aureole.

Danielle added: “He has been off on three separate occasions for the film work and has been treated like a star.”


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