Relief promised to queuing motorists

PUBLISHED: 11:42 15 January 2009 | UPDATED: 13:51 06 May 2010

FRUSTRATED motorists who find themselves queuing to get through the city centre s busiest lights could find there is some relief in sight. Long queues frequently snake back from High Street into Verulam Road, St Albans, as traffic tries to get through th

FRUSTRATED motorists who find themselves queuing to get through the city centre's busiest lights could find there is some relief in sight.

Long queues frequently snake back from High Street into Verulam Road, St Albans, as traffic tries to get through the Peahen junction, a notorious bottleneck made worse by the multi-million pound city-centre enhancement scheme.

Herts County Councillor Chris White has had complaints from people in the city centre he represents for the last couple of years and has seen for himself how long the queues can be.

He has also noticed how it has turned Spencer Street into a rat run as motorists try to avoid the jams.

Cllr White puts most of the problems down to the phasing of the pedestrian crossing opposite the Clock Tower rather than the Peahen junction itself which now has three-way phasing plus a pedestrian phase.

He said this week: "I think it is mainly the pedestrian crossing because if that was not there, the fact that there is three-way working at the lights should speed things up."

He has been in touch with Herts Highways which has conceded there is a problem there and that it can be fixed.

A spokesperson for Herts Highways said the problem appeared to be the configuration of the signals at the pedestrian crossing and the Peahen Junction signals which led to problems with delays, particularly at peak periods.

He added: "The engineers are now going to look at the control box at the Peahen and install a new piece of Smart software to improve the crossing times which we hope will improve the co-ordination with the Clock Tower signals."

He said the project was in the programme alongside other priorities and work was due to start in four to six weeks time and added: "We can't guarantee that it will cure the problems but we are more confident that it will help to reduce queues.


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