Refugee Tales walking tour comes to St Albans and Hatfield

PUBLISHED: 17:13 21 June 2018

Refugee Tales 2016. Picture: Sarah Hickson

Refugee Tales 2016. Picture: Sarah Hickson

Sarah Hickson

A modern-day Canterbury Tales is coming through Hatfield and St Albans in July in solidarity with refugees.

Refugee Tales 2016. Picture: Sarah HicksonRefugee Tales 2016. Picture: Sarah Hickson

Over 100 people have signed up to the first day of Refugee Tales, starting out at Fleetville Community Centre in St Albans on July 7, and passing through the grounds of Hatfield House the same day.

People born in the UK, and people currently seeking refuge, both join the five days of walks, which are an opportunity for dialogue and mutual support.

Each evening after the walkers have reached their destination, there are talks and storytelling from writers and former detainees highlighting the experiences of people seeking refuge in the UK.

Mary Barrett, one of the organisers, said: “The walk is to accompany and walk alongside people who have experienced coming to this country for sanctuary.

“We then try to communicate their stories and their experiences through our evenings events.

“It’s about dialogue, friendship and community.

“That’s what our walks are all about.”

One former detainee who joined the walks in previous years said: “I am not allowed to work, and the days seem very lonely and long.

Going on the walks mean the walking days are better for me.

“I had never experienced the countryside.”

The wandering band of walkers and tale-tellers will be travelling through Hertfordshire and London from July 6 to 11.

On the Hatfield and St Albans leg of the walk, the evening’s entertainment at All Saints’ Church in Hertford will consist of poetry from Hubert Moore, a story from Roma Tearne and a former detainee, and music from Na-Mara.

The project is organised by Gatwick Detainees Welfare Group, a charity that provides support to people incarcerated at Gatwick Airport, and campaigns against indefinite detention for refugees.

You can join Refugee Tales for all or part of the walk for a small fee here: www.refugeetales.org/the-walk-of-2018

More news stories

15:00

It’s said to be the most wonderful time of the year, but is it really for everyone?

14:30

Tickets have gone on sale for an annual Hertfordshire music festival at a special discounted price.

09:00

More than 100 children in St Albans will be homeless this Christmas, according to housing charity Shelter.

09:00

Court results published by the Herts Ad are taken from St Albans, Stevenage and Hatfield Magistrates Court and are published without prejudice.

CountryPhile

I should probably have taken the hint! Walking out into the garden recently an unprecedented flock of thirty or more crows raucously greeted me from the treetops at the bottom of my garden. Cawing and croaking these big, black birds clung clumsily to the top most branches and twigs, jostling and flapping to stay balanced in a constant flurry of feathers. There is always something ominous about crows – they are after all carrion crows, the vultures of the bird world – always watching for scraps and weakness that might mean their next meal.

Digital Edition

Image
Read the The Herts Advertiser e-edition E-edition
Zoo Watch CountryPhile

Newsletter Sign Up

Herts Advertiser weekly newsletter
Sign up to receive our regular email newsletter

Our Privacy Policy

Most read stories

Hot Jobs

Show Job Lists

Herts Most Wanted Herts Business Awards