Rare algae invades Verulamium Park lake

PUBLISHED: 10:40 16 July 2008 | UPDATED: 13:25 06 May 2010

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Time: 14:06:18.082

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A RARE form of algae which is next to impossible to clear has appeared on Verulamium Lake. Known as lettuce and marine algae, it appeared briefly in early June when it was removed by netting. But it has been actively regrowing since and now St Albans Dist

A RARE form of algae which is next to impossible to clear has appeared on Verulamium Lake.

Known as lettuce and marine algae, it appeared briefly in early June when it was removed by netting.

But it has been actively regrowing since and now St Albans District Council is investigating a more permanent way of removing it.

The algae, which is not dangerous but is more usually associated with salt water, is very prolific and similar to duck weed in that once it is cleared out, it reappears if only a small piece is left behind.

The council has had contractors removing the algae on a full-time basis but it has reappeared within two days of it being removed.

Now the council is hoping to use a special form of dye which lasts for about four months and stops the algae from photosynthesizing.

It has to seek permission from the Environment Agency as to whether the dye can be used in the water and a decision was expected to be given today (Wednesday).

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