Rabbit with deformed jaw found in St Albans, now with RSPCA

PUBLISHED: 14:00 24 August 2015

Poor Cotton has been found abandoned in St Albans, suffering with a deformed jaw and overgrown teeth

Poor Cotton has been found abandoned in St Albans, suffering with a deformed jaw and overgrown teeth

photo supplied

A rabbit found abandoned in St Albans may have to have teeth removed because his jaw has become so deformed that the animal struggles to eat.

Poor Cotton has been found abandoned in St Albans, suffering with a deformed jaw and overgrown teethPoor Cotton has been found abandoned in St Albans, suffering with a deformed jaw and overgrown teeth

The RSPCA is appealing for information after the frightened and underweight baby rabbit was discovered in Camp Road last Tuesday (18).

Animal collection officer Kate Wright said: “He is only a young bunny and in a very poor state.

“His front teeth are severely overgrown with the bottom sticking up out of the front of his face and the top two curling sideways into the back of his mouth.

“He must have been in agony - bless him - and clearly unable to eat. He also has a respiratory infection which may or may not be caused by his teeth.”

The charity picked up Cotton, a domestic rabbit, from St Albans police station last week after a police officer found him alone and frightened in Camp Road.

Cotton, who is thought to be around six months old, has a deformed jaw. As his teeth do not meet, they have become very overgrown.

He is now making a good recovery after receiving veterinary treatment and being placed on antibiotics at the RSPCA’s South Bucks branch.

Cotton’s teeth have been trimmed back but they will need to be trimmed regularly or removed altogether because of the deformation in the jaw.

Kate said she did not know whether he was born with a deformed jaw, or it was the result of a knock.

Dr Jane Tyson, rabbit behaviour and welfare expert at the RSPCA said: “A lot of people don’t realise that a rabbit’s teeth grow continuously.

“A rabbit’s diet can help keep their teeth down so we always advise owners to give them plenty of hay to eat. Rabbits need at least one bundle of good quality hay that’s as big as they are every day.

“Up until June this year we had already received more than 400 calls to our cruelty line about concerns relating to rabbits.”

If anyone knows anything about Cotton and how he came to be on his own, please phone the inspectorate line on 0300 123 8018.

There is more rabbit welfare information available on the RSPCA’s website.

And if you are interested in adopting one, please ring Heather Gobran on 01494 863009.


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