Professor's dancing techniques to attract the opposite sex

PUBLISHED: 19:24 14 October 2008 | UPDATED: 13:39 06 May 2010

DOING a dance is a sure way for men to attract the opposite sex, according to a psychology professor at the University of Herts. Dr Peter Lovatt teaches the only Psychology of Performance module in the UK and he spent his summer researching what features

DOING a dance is a sure way for men to attract the opposite sex, according to a psychology professor at the University of Herts.

Dr Peter Lovatt teaches the only Psychology of Performance module in the UK and he spent his summer researching what features of men's freestyle dance appeal to prospective partners.

The professor, who is a keen dancer, believes floor-busting moves can communicate dominance, masculinity, attractiveness and quality (DMAQ) to women and he will test his hypothesis at the university's health and human sciences showcase next week.

Test subjects will have their ears and fingers measured at his stand before being asked to dance or describe their dance moves.

Dr Lovatt, who lives in Harpenden, explained: "Men with symmetrical ears or a fourth finger that is considerably longer than their second will probably have high levels of testosterone and it is these men who are apparently more attractive on the dance floor."

He added: "At our showcase, we could help men with low prenatal testosterone to dance the dance of high testosterone by just varying their moves on the dance floor."

Dr Lovatt, aged 43, said: "I still like a bit of disco dancing, although recently I've had to restrict my style to something more age-appropriate!"

He is choreographing January's Harpenden Gang Show and his future plans include investigating the relationship between women's style of dancing and their attractiveness.

Dr Lovatt will be at his stand at the Showcase next Tuesday, October 21, from 6-9pm and on Thursday, October 23, from 8-10:15am and 6-9pm.

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