‘Uniquely moving’ Poppy Fields installation at St Albans Cathedral

PUBLISHED: 12:18 30 October 2018 | UPDATED: 16:25 30 October 2018

The Poppy Fields installation at St Albans Cathedral. Picture: Sally Masson

The Poppy Fields installation at St Albans Cathedral. Picture: Sally Masson

Sally Masson Photography

St Albans Cathedral was filled with illuminated poppies over the weekend to mark the centenary of the First World War.

The Poppy Fields installation at St Albans Cathedral. Picture: Sally MassonThe Poppy Fields installation at St Albans Cathedral. Picture: Sally Masson

The Poppy Fields installation saw record-breaking numbers of people visit the Cathedral to remember loved ones and those lost in conflict.

Lichfield Cathedral’s artistic director Peter Walker created the touring installation, which featured more than 2,000 names of local soldiers who served in the armed forces and falling rose petals over the shrine of St Alban.

The installation was accompanied by a ‘sound artwork’ which included four readings of WWI poems by actor Eddie Redmayne.

Rev Dr Jeffrey John, the Dean of St Albans Cathedral, described the installation as “uniquely moving” and said: “We are very grateful to the creators of this superb presentation, to the generous sponsors who supported it and to the many volunteers who worked so hard to make it possible.”

More than 8,000 people attended the installation. Rev John said: “We were very sorry that the crowds on Friday night meant we had to turn some people away.

“We were humbled by the numbers who wanted to attend and had to respond quickly to ensure crowd safety.”

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I should probably have taken the hint! Walking out into the garden recently an unprecedented flock of thirty or more crows raucously greeted me from the treetops at the bottom of my garden. Cawing and croaking these big, black birds clung clumsily to the top most branches and twigs, jostling and flapping to stay balanced in a constant flurry of feathers. There is always something ominous about crows – they are after all carrion crows, the vultures of the bird world – always watching for scraps and weakness that might mean their next meal.

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