New Managing Director For First Capital Connect

PUBLISHED: 10:18 18 January 2010 | UPDATED: 14:50 06 May 2010

FIRST Capital Connect (FCC) has announced the appointment of a new managing director. Former FCC engineering and new trains director, Neal Lawson will be taking on the role. Since joining the company in May 2009, he has been responsible for the delivery o

FIRST Capital Connect (FCC) has announced the appointment of a new managing director.

Former FCC engineering and new trains director, Neal Lawson will be taking on the role.

Since joining the company in May 2009, he has been responsible for the delivery of the next generation of rolling stock for the £5.5billion Thameslink Programme, and has 25 years of rail experience in total.

Mary Grant, managing director rail and chair of FCC, said: "I am delighted to have a team in place that will take us forward as the Thameslink Programme unfolds and connects the Thameslink route to the Great Northern route.

"We recognise that following our recent service disruption it has been a difficult and frustrating time for our customers. This team, led by Neal, has the determination, skills and experience to improve performance and give our customers the service they deserve."

Former managing director Elaine Holt left the company in March of last year and Jim Morgan, the development director for rail, replaced her on an interim basis.

FCC has come under heavy fire from commuters in recent months after ongoing disruption to services caused by a dispute with drivers over pay and problems caused by the recent freezing weather.

As revealed by the Herts Advertiser last week, passengers have been calling for the company to lose their franchise.

But in a meeting with St Albans district councillors last week, integration and partnership manager Larry Heyman admitted services had been unacceptable and promised a major overhaul of management and services.

St Albans MP Anne Main said: "I hope this brings a sense of direction, purpose and the ability to deliver the franchise and a willingness to look into what went wrong and how they allowed themselves to get into this dreadful state."


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