Fundraising campaign aims to replace torched outdoor classroom in Redbourn

PUBLISHED: 08:00 06 August 2017

St Luke's Special School assistant head Carol Morris and learning support assistant James Tulley with year 6, 7 and 8 pupils Lewis, Paul, Alexander and Alfie in front of the burnt down outside classroom. Picture: Danny Loo

St Luke's Special School assistant head Carol Morris and learning support assistant James Tulley with year 6, 7 and 8 pupils Lewis, Paul, Alexander and Alfie in front of the burnt down outside classroom. Picture: Danny Loo

Danny Loo Photography 2017

The National Citizen Service is raising money for a school for disabled children after its outdoor classroom was burned down.

The burnt down outside classroom at St Luke's Special School. Picture: Danny LooThe burnt down outside classroom at St Luke's Special School. Picture: Danny Loo

The National Citizen Service is organising a fair to raise money for a school for disabled children after its outdoor classroom was burned down.

St Luke’s School in Redbourn, which is for pupils with learning difficulties, had its classrooms destroyed in an arson attack on Thursday, June 29. Two donkeys, which were held in nearby stables, escaped and were found later by police.

The National Citizen Service (NCS) now wants to help the school raise money to rebuild the classroom and pay to get the donkeys, who are named Edward and Isaac, back from the police.

Hana Walker, from NCS, said the pupils benefit from having donkeys at the school. She said: “It’s a great way for them to develop vocational skills and life skills while working with the donkeys so for them to lose that is really sad.

The burnt down outside classroom at St Luke's Special School. Picture: Danny LooThe burnt down outside classroom at St Luke's Special School. Picture: Danny Loo

“I think we all felt very upset about it because we can’t really imagine someone doing something as horrific as that. You can’t imagine a human being who could be so cruel and thoughtless.

“We were inspired to help the situation and to not only get the classroom back but to make them even better than before.”

According to the school’s fundraising page, the raised classroom was purpose-built to be wheelchair accessible, and offered pupils views over the animal enclosures and meadows. As well as rebuilding the classroom, the money will also be used to buy new metal fencing and replace the animals’ food and grooming equipment.

The animal-themed fair will be held from 11am to 4pm on Thursday, August 3, at Fleetville Community Centre in Royal Road.

There will be a bouncy castle, a tombola, a cake sale, balloons and possibly a petting area. Visitors are welcome to bring their pets.

Carol Morris, assistant headteacher at St Luke’s, said the combined cost of building a new classroom and reclaiming the donkeys is £37,000. She told the Herts Ad that the fire must have been arson, as the classroom had not had electricity installed yet, and the intruders must have broken in by removing panels from the security fence. They then released the donkeys before setting the classroom alight.

To donate to the NCS page go to https://www.justgiving.com/crowdfunding/ncs-team4-1, or to donate directly to the school go to https://www.justgiving.com/crowdfunding/stlukesredbourn

More news stories

19:00

Visitor and traders’ early reactions to St Albans’ highly -debated Christmas winter wonderland event have proved a mixed bag.

17:06

Police are warning residents against deliberately leaving their cars unlocked to stop property damage.

14:15

Village shoppers will be rewarded for staying local as part of a new loyalty scheme.

A new healthcare facility has been opened at St Albans City Hospital by the district mayor Rosemary Farmer.

CountryPhile

I should probably have taken the hint! Walking out into the garden recently an unprecedented flock of thirty or more crows raucously greeted me from the treetops at the bottom of my garden. Cawing and croaking these big, black birds clung clumsily to the top most branches and twigs, jostling and flapping to stay balanced in a constant flurry of feathers. There is always something ominous about crows – they are after all carrion crows, the vultures of the bird world – always watching for scraps and weakness that might mean their next meal.

Digital Edition

Image
Read the The Herts Advertiser e-edition E-edition
Zoo Watch CountryPhile

Newsletter Sign Up

Herts Advertiser weekly newsletter
Sign up to receive our regular email newsletter

Our Privacy Policy

Most read stories

Hot Jobs

Show Job Lists

Herts Most Wanted Herts Business Awards