Lady Verulam opens farm to fork school in Harpenden

Ian Pigott, founder of Farmschool, with Lord-Lieutenant of Hertfordshire, The Countess of Verulam, o

Ian Pigott, founder of Farmschool, with Lord-Lieutenant of Hertfordshire, The Countess of Verulam, opens the Farmschool in Harpenden - Credit: Archant

A fifth-generation farmer keen to show pupils where the food on their plate comes from has launched a new agricultural school.

Ian Pigott, founder of Farmschool, Gracie Pigott and Lucy Bates hand flowers to Lord-Lieutenant of H

Ian Pigott, founder of Farmschool, Gracie Pigott and Lucy Bates hand flowers to Lord-Lieutenant of Hertfordshire, The Countess of Verulam, after opening the Farmschool in Harpenden - Credit: Archant

Ian Pigott was joined by the Lord Lieutenant of Herts, Lady Verulam, at last Wednesday’s (9) official opening of The Farmschool, at Annables Farm, Annables Lane in Harpenden.

The farmer said he was pleased that Lady Verulam attended the launch, which included a short presentation and tree planting ceremony, as “she is a great ambassador for Herts and the countryside”.

The event doubled as a small commemoration for this county’s deputy Lieutenants, as they also marked the milestone day on which Queen Elizabeth II became the longest-reigning monarch in British history.

Ian said that the school would help teach visitors, particularly children and young people aged between eight and 18, about farming, food, and caring for the environment through workshops and outdoor-based activities on a working farm.

Ian Pigott, founder of Farmschool, with Lord-Lieutenant of Hertfordshire, The Countess of Verulam, a

Ian Pigott, founder of Farmschool, with Lord-Lieutenant of Hertfordshire, The Countess of Verulam, after opening the Farmschool in Harpenden - Credit: Archant


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He explained that he was passionate about reconnecting people with the land, to show where their food came from.

The school, which has already welcomed over 3,200 visitors over the past year ahead of it recently gaining charitable status, includes a working kitchen to allow pupils see the entire cycle, “from farm to fork”.

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Ian said the school, which also teaches kids from disadvantaged areas, was large enough to cater for entire year groups, as it could take up to 60 children at a time.

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