200 knives surrendered in a single week in Herts Police knife amnesty

PUBLISHED: 12:32 26 September 2018 | UPDATED: 12:32 26 September 2018

Knives handed in to Stevenage Police Station. Picture: Herts police

Knives handed in to Stevenage Police Station. Picture: Herts police

Herts police

The Hertfordshire police knife amnesty took a huge number of blades off our streets, including swords, military knives and ‘elven’ knives.

Knives handed in to Watford Police Station. Picture: Herts policeKnives handed in to Watford Police Station. Picture: Herts police

The knife amnesty took place between September 18 and 24, resulting in a good haul of unwanted knives and other potential weapons.

Other weapons included kitchen knives, cleavers and knuckle dusters.

Hatfield police station received 90 knives, Stevenage took in 52, and Watford had 47.

An event at Waltham Cross on September 19 and 22 also brought in 11 bladed weapons including a set of ‘elven knives’ - fighting knives inspired by the Lord of the Rings character Legolas.

Knives handed in at an event in Walthan Cross. Picture: Herts policeKnives handed in at an event in Walthan Cross. Picture: Herts police

The amnesty, which brought in more knives than the last one, was part of a national campaign, Operation Sceptre, being run by police forces across the country to reduce the number of illegal knives in circulation.

Due to an increase in knife-related incidents across the country over the last three years, the amnesty provided an opportunity to issue some strong messages and advice about the risks of carrying a knife in public.

Other campaign activities included test purchasing operations with cadets, to ensure retailers were adhering to laws regarding knife sales to those under 18.

Police and crime commissioner for Hertfordshire, David Lloyd, said: “The Operation Sceptre amnesties form a key part of Hertfordshire’s Serious Violence Strategy to reduce the number of knives on the streets and also provide an opportunity to raise awareness of this issue.

Knives handed in to Hatfield Police Station. Picture: Herts policeKnives handed in to Hatfield Police Station. Picture: Herts police

“It is great that there has been a positive response to this campaign and a number of knives have been surrendered.

“However, we all need to continue to work together in Hertfordshire to educate young people about the dangers of knives and crack down on those who are carrying weapons.”

Campaign leader Inspector Andrew Palfreyman from Hertfordshire Constabulary’s Crime Reduction Unit said: “Over the next three years we will be implementing our Serious Violence Strategy, which is a longer term plan for dealing with knife crime in the county.

“As part of this strategy we are looking at how we can educate young people about the potential consequences of carrying a knife, which is not only putting themselves at risk of injury but is also illegal and if they are found carrying one they will be arrested.

Knives handed in to Hatfield Police Station. Picture: Herts policeKnives handed in to Hatfield Police Station. Picture: Herts police

“We will also be looking at the impact that knife crime has on individuals, their families and communities and how knives are getting into the hands of under 18-year-olds, as well as targeting those we know are carrying knives.”

Knives handed in to Hatfield Police Station. Picture: Herts policeKnives handed in to Hatfield Police Station. Picture: Herts police

Knives handed in to Hatfield Police Station. Picture: Herts policeKnives handed in to Hatfield Police Station. Picture: Herts police

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I should probably have taken the hint! Walking out into the garden recently an unprecedented flock of thirty or more crows raucously greeted me from the treetops at the bottom of my garden. Cawing and croaking these big, black birds clung clumsily to the top most branches and twigs, jostling and flapping to stay balanced in a constant flurry of feathers. There is always something ominous about crows – they are after all carrion crows, the vultures of the bird world – always watching for scraps and weakness that might mean their next meal.

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