Battle against hate crime in Hertfordshire is taken to the web

PUBLISHED: 10:38 24 October 2018

Police with rainbow flag at Hatfield police station in 2016.

Police with rainbow flag at Hatfield police station in 2016.

Archant

A new website has been launched for reporting hate crime across Hertfordshire.

As the website introduction says: “Hertfordshire is generally a safe and tolerant county. But like other areas, hate crimes can occur and many of them go unreported to the police.”

Following National Hate Crime Awareness Week last week (October 13 to 20), a partnership body including the county council, the police, Youth Connexions and other key organisations have come together to launch the website.

It provides key information about what a hate crime is and how to access support if you have been affected by it.

Hate crimes are criminal offences - such as assaults, harassment or criminal damage - where the victim has been targeted because of their race, religion, sexual orientation, transgender identity or disability.

The website has been written in easy-to-read language to ensure it’s widely accessible, including for people with lower literacy levels.

The pages have also been designed to be easily translatable to reach people whose second language is English, and who may be at higher risk from hate crime.

Visit the site at www.hertfordshire.gov.uk/hertsagainsthate

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I should probably have taken the hint! Walking out into the garden recently an unprecedented flock of thirty or more crows raucously greeted me from the treetops at the bottom of my garden. Cawing and croaking these big, black birds clung clumsily to the top most branches and twigs, jostling and flapping to stay balanced in a constant flurry of feathers. There is always something ominous about crows – they are after all carrion crows, the vultures of the bird world – always watching for scraps and weakness that might mean their next meal.

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