Harpenden-Luton incinerator developers confirm they have no airport customers

PUBLISHED: 13:38 02 August 2018 | UPDATED: 13:52 02 August 2018

The land around Lower Harpenden Rd, between Harpenden and Luton which has been identified as a possible site for an incinerator. Picture: DANNY LOO

The land around Lower Harpenden Rd, between Harpenden and Luton which has been identified as a possible site for an incinerator. Picture: DANNY LOO

©2018 Danny Loo Photography - all rights reserved

The proposers of the Harpenden-Luton incinerator have confirmed there has been no deal struck between them and Luton Airport’s landowners.

This week, the Herts Advertiser published a letter sent by London Luton Airport Ltd (LLAL) chief operating officer Robin Porter to energy company Emsrayne.

He wrote that their proposal for the Lea Bank Energy Park at New Mill End would be an excellent opportunity to provide heat and power to the airport and future developments in the area.

A spokesperson for Emsrayne has now said: “No deal or arrangement has been made with LLAL or any related company for the combined heat and power facility to provide energy or heat, nor is there any deal to receive waste given the facility will be fuelled by RDF.”

Luton Borough Council, which runs LLAL, has sought to distance itself from the incinerator proposal, with both the council’s leader Hazel Simmons and cabinet member Andy Malcolm insisting it has nothing to do with the council.

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