New St Albans charity kicks off by raising £3,300 at 80s disco

PUBLISHED: 09:59 08 February 2018 | UPDATED: 09:59 08 February 2018

Left to right: Fiona Cullen, Dawn Baker, Barry Smith, Shelly Wraight, Anna-Ruby Yates, Nina Smith. Picture: Harry-Krish Mootoosamy Foundation

Left to right: Fiona Cullen, Dawn Baker, Barry Smith, Shelly Wraight, Anna-Ruby Yates, Nina Smith. Picture: Harry-Krish Mootoosamy Foundation

Archant

A new charity set up by a inspirational woman in her brother’s memory raised £3,300 at its first fundraising event.

Harry-Krish's Loreto and St Columba's School friends, including four of his band. Picture: Harry-Krish Mootoosamy FoundationHarry-Krish's Loreto and St Columba's School friends, including four of his band. Picture: Harry-Krish Mootoosamy Foundation

Although this is the fourth time the Harry-Krish Mootoosamy Foundation has held an 80s disco at the Old Albanian’s Rugby Club, it is the first time it did so as a registered charity.

The foundation was pioneered by Harry-Krish’s sister, Anna-Ruby Yates, and it has two goals - support music projects for terminally ill children and raise awareness of the symptoms of pancreatic cancer, which took Harry-Krish at 39-years-old.

The St Albans dad-of-three fought the Stage IV cancer for seven months in 2014, before leaving behind his wife and family.

Music was a big part of Harry-Krish’s life, as he sung lead in a band with school friends from St Columba’s College and Loreto College.

Anna-Ruby's St Albans Girls' School Friends. Picture: Harry-Krish Mootoosamy FoundationAnna-Ruby's St Albans Girls' School Friends. Picture: Harry-Krish Mootoosamy Foundation

Guests at the 80s disco included friends and family of Harry-Krish and it was DJ’d by John Mcdowell. Everyone was dressed in 80s fashion trends.

Anna-Ruby said: “Harry-Krish lived 39 very happy and full years and the aim of the charity is to make a difference to children who are seriously ill and bring them some light on their toughest days, just as he did to everyone that knew him.

“His two passions were his children and music and the way in which he lived his full and happy life, always seeing the good in any situation, inspired the charitable causes of bringing music to terminally or critically ill children.”

She said he was “a very special, loving and considerate person who touched the lives of many people”.

Left to right: Fiona Cullen, Dawn Baker, Shelly Wraight, Anna-Ruby Yates, Nina Smith. Picture: Harry-Krish Mootoosamy FoundationLeft to right: Fiona Cullen, Dawn Baker, Shelly Wraight, Anna-Ruby Yates, Nina Smith. Picture: Harry-Krish Mootoosamy Foundation

Funds from the 80s disco will be shared with well-established charities such as the Keech Hospice in Luton - which provide free, specialist care for people with life-limiting and terminal illnesses.

Although the foundation has only just received charitable status, Anna-Ruby has already fundraised thousands for Pancreatic Cancer UK over the last few years.

Pancreatic Cancer UK list the symptoms of the terminal illness as loss of appetite, changes to bowel movements, jaundice, nausea, vomiting, difficulty swallowing, and recently diagnosed diabetes. For more information about the foundation, email info@hkmfoundation.org

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