Harpenden historians holding talk on Kubrick’s old haunt

PUBLISHED: 18:00 24 November 2017

St Mary’s Church, Childwickbury. Photo supplied by the Harpenden Local History Society.

St Mary’s Church, Childwickbury. Photo supplied by the Harpenden Local History Society.

Archant

Harpenden Local History Society are holding a talk next week on the history of Childwickbury.

St Mary’s foundation stone, laid 150 years ago in 1867. Photo supplied by the Harpenden Local History Society.St Mary’s foundation stone, laid 150 years ago in 1867. Photo supplied by the Harpenden Local History Society.

The tiny private village between St Albans and Harpenden was owned by the Toulmin family in the 19th century.

More recently it was the residence of film director Stanley Kubrick, until his death in 1999.

The director finished his films Full Metal Jacket and Eyes Wide Shut in the hamlet.

His wife Christiane, a local artist, still lives in the village’s manor house.

On Tuesday, November 28, at Harpenden Public Halls from 8pm historian Christine Aitkin will speak on the village’s history.

Her talk will focus on St Mary’s, Childwickbury’s church, which is celebrating its 150th birthday this year.

It was designed by George Gilbert Scott, the architect behind St Pancras Station Hotel and the Albert Memorial in Kensington Gardens.

More news stories

Yesterday, 09:00

A former St Albans district councillor received an MBE at Buckingham Palace for his work helping the community.

Yesterday, 09:00

Court results published by the Herts Ad are taken from St Albans, Stevenage and Hatfield Magistrates Court and are published without prejudice.

Saturday, December 8, 2018

This year’s St Albans pantomime Cinderella only opened on Thursday night and tickets are already on sale for 2019’s Christmas show.

Saturday, December 8, 2018

More than a quarter of the pubs in St Albans district have shut since 2001, new data has shown.

CountryPhile

I should probably have taken the hint! Walking out into the garden recently an unprecedented flock of thirty or more crows raucously greeted me from the treetops at the bottom of my garden. Cawing and croaking these big, black birds clung clumsily to the top most branches and twigs, jostling and flapping to stay balanced in a constant flurry of feathers. There is always something ominous about crows – they are after all carrion crows, the vultures of the bird world – always watching for scraps and weakness that might mean their next meal.

Digital Edition

Image
Read the The Herts Advertiser e-edition E-edition
Zoo Watch CountryPhile

Newsletter Sign Up

Herts Advertiser weekly newsletter
Sign up to receive our regular email newsletter

Our Privacy Policy

Most read stories

Hot Jobs

Show Job Lists

Herts Most Wanted Herts Business Awards