Govia Thameslink Railway extending compensation scheme to non-season ticket holders

PUBLISHED: 15:05 28 August 2018 | UPDATED: 16:50 28 August 2018

A new Thameslink train

A new Thameslink train

www.peteralvey.com

Govia Thameslink Railway has offered compensation to customers who did not use season tickets during the recent disruption.

The company, which runs Thameslink and Great Northern train services, had originally only opened the scheme to people who were caught up in disruption following a botched timetable change in May and had season tickets.

Now, in addition to Delay Repay, it is offering money back to the following eligible ticket holders:

• Anytime and off-peak day travelcards, singles or returns

• Peak and off-peak carnets

• KeyGo (GTR’s pay-as-you-go smartcard scheme)

• Oyster Pay As You Go

• Contactless

• Railcard discounted tickets

Qualifying passengers are those who have made a minimum of three days’ return travel in any week, Monday to Sunday, between May 20 to July 28 from the most affected stations. Passengers using discounted books of Carnets are included.

Compensation will be based on the cost of tickets purchased for a period of between one and four weeks. The value of compensation may vary according to ticket type.

Chief executive Patrick Verwer said: “We have listened to feedback. We believe it is right to extend the compensation scheme beyond season ticket holders to other regular travellers.

“We are sorry for the disruption in the weeks that followed the May timetable change. Overall, the train services on Thameslink and Great Northern have been stable, more reliable and more frequent since the introduction of the interim timetable on July 15. We have also introduced 200 more services than before the May timetable change.”

Phase one of the compensation scheme will begin this week and Govia Thameslink will be contacting qualifying season ticket holders.

For full details of the scheme and how it is being phased, visit railcompensation.thameslinkrailway.com.

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