Girls upset by make-up ban

PUBLISHED: 12:36 26 January 2006 | UPDATED: 20:19 03 May 2010

A SCHOOL has been accused of singling out a group of girls over their use of make-up to cover spots. The mother of one 14-year-old claimed her daughter and half-a-dozen others at Sandringham School in The Ridgeway, St Albans, were being picked on by staff

A SCHOOL has been accused of singling out a group of girls over their use of make-up to cover spots. The mother of one 14-year-old claimed her daughter and half-a-dozen others at Sandringham School in The Ridgeway, St Albans, were being picked on by staff while others got away with wearing make-up She said: "They only use a little foundation to cover up spots and a touch of mascara. They are not painting themselves up like girls going to the pub on a Saturday night." The woman, who did not want to be named, said: "I accept that the school has a no make-up rule but I am complaining because I do not believe it is being applied fairly. I also feel Sandringham should get into the 21st century. Not all schools in St Albans have the same rule and perhaps it is time they agreed that sometimes girls need to use a little foundation to cover up a spot or a blemish." Head Alan Gray (pictured) said the no-make-up rule had been in force for some years and was generally accepted by girls. He added: "We enforce it rigidly when we see girls wearing make-up and when they are spotted they usually wipe it off.

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