Firefighters rescue dog trapped in rabbit warren

PUBLISHED: 12:26 03 November 2008 | UPDATED: 13:43 06 May 2010

The rescued Barney with owner Paul Salmon and Firefighter Marc Cavaciuti

The rescued Barney with owner Paul Salmon and Firefighter Marc Cavaciuti

A DOG was rescued by firefighters after being stuck down a rabbit warren for nearly 12 hours. Barney, a four-year-old Jack Russell, chased a rabbit down a hole in the gravel pits in Park Street at around midday on Sunday. His owner spent the day trying t

A DOG was rescued by firefighters after being stuck down a rabbit warren for nearly 12 hours.

Barney, a four-year-old Jack Russell, chased a rabbit down a hole in the gravel pits in Park Street at around midday on Sunday.

His owner spent the day trying to coax him out but was unsuccessful and he called on a fire crew from St Albans at around 11.30pm.

When the firefighters arrived at the scene behind How Wood train station they found a number of holes and it wasn't clear which one Barney was stuck down.

Crew Commander Russell Knights said: "We were trying to place which hole he was down and we were digging round each of the different entrances. One of the firefighters stuck his hand down and could feel Barney's nose so we dug into the hole and pulled him out."

He added: "He was unharmed but very dirty. He was happy to be rescued.

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CountryPhile

I should probably have taken the hint! Walking out into the garden recently an unprecedented flock of thirty or more crows raucously greeted me from the treetops at the bottom of my garden. Cawing and croaking these big, black birds clung clumsily to the top most branches and twigs, jostling and flapping to stay balanced in a constant flurry of feathers. There is always something ominous about crows – they are after all carrion crows, the vultures of the bird world – always watching for scraps and weakness that might mean their next meal.

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