Family tribute to son killed in crash

PUBLISHED: 14:48 13 March 2008 | UPDATED: 13:05 06 May 2010

Sam Read

Sam Read

THE family of a motorcyclist who died in a collision with a car have paid tribute to their son. Sam Read, aged 21, who worked for his dad at Rhys Davis Haulage in Radlett, was killed when his Honda 125cc motorbike collided with a blue Rover 600 in Darkes

THE family of a motorcyclist who died in a collision with a car have paid tribute to their son.

Sam Read, aged 21, who worked for his dad at Rhys Davis Haulage in Radlett, was killed when his Honda 125cc motorbike collided with a blue Rover 600 in Darkes Lane, Potters Bar, at around 11.15pm last Friday, March 7.

He was taken to the QEII Hospital in Welwyn Garden City and was later transferred to the Royal Free in London where he died as a result of his injuries on Monday, March 10.

Sam lived with his dad Tony, brother Joe, aged 23, and best friend Daniel Galloway in Potters Bar. A devoted Spurs fan who was at the Carling Cup Final, he loved socialising and last summer travelled to Egypt with a group of friends.

His mum Julie, who lives in Cheshunt with his sisters Lauren, aged 16, and Lucy, 18, said they had been overwhelmed with messages of support from friends and colleagues.

The family described Sam as a "sociable, generous and popular" son and a brother who loved life.

Joe added: "He was a really loveable guy whom we love and miss immensely.

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