End in sight for abstraction from River Ver near Redbourn

PUBLISHED: 19:30 05 August 2016

Environment Agency Acting Chair Emma Howard-Boyd met with Simon Cocks, Chief Executive, Affinity Water, representatives of the Ver Valley Society and staff from Affinity Water and the Environment Agency at the River Ver.

Environment Agency Acting Chair Emma Howard-Boyd met with Simon Cocks, Chief Executive, Affinity Water, representatives of the Ver Valley Society and staff from Affinity Water and the Environment Agency at the River Ver.

Archant

A long-running campaign to persuade the local water company to stop abstraction from the River Ver near Redbourn is finally coming to fruition.

The Ver Valley Society has been pressing for the Friars Wash pumping station to be switched off for many years because of concerns about the impact on the Ver, which is a rare chalk stream, and the surrounding environment.

Now, after working closely with the society and the Environment Agency (EA), Affinity Water has agreed to a programme of reducing abstractions.

By 2020 42 million fewer litres of water will be abstracted each day and by 2025 that figure will rise to 70 million litres.

There are only 240 chalk streams in England, of which 10 per cent are in the Affinity Water supply area. As well as reducing abstraction, Affinity has also committed to delivering river restoration and habitat-enhancement projects on the Ver and six other chalk streams in partnership with the EA.

This week all three parties came together to mark the reduction of water abstraction. Jane Gardiner, chair of the Ver Valley Society, said: : “We are very pleased that the first of several abstraction reductions in the Ver Valley, planned by Affinity Water, has now taken place.

“We have been campaigning over many years for such reductions to ensure that the River Ver continues to flow and its very special ecology and wildlife are protected.”

Simon Cocks, chief executive of Affinity Water, added: “We believe that leaving more water in the environment and working in partnership with the EA, to deliver improvements to local habitats, will benefit communities by restoring our precious chalk stream habitats and we will be monitoring water flows and the ecology to assess the effectiveness of these changes.”

More news stories

13 minutes ago

Police are warning drivers to protect their cars after a spate of car thefts in St Albans, Harpenden and London Colney.

Ambulances have been head butted, kicked, and had blue lights ripped off in shocking acts of vandalism on the emergency vehicles - sometimes while crews have been trying to treat patients.

A patient was fitted with the wrong implant during knee surgery at St Albans City Hospital.

An appeal for witnesses has been made following a crash involving two cars on the A5 in Markyate.

CountryPhile

I should probably have taken the hint! Walking out into the garden recently an unprecedented flock of thirty or more crows raucously greeted me from the treetops at the bottom of my garden. Cawing and croaking these big, black birds clung clumsily to the top most branches and twigs, jostling and flapping to stay balanced in a constant flurry of feathers. There is always something ominous about crows – they are after all carrion crows, the vultures of the bird world – always watching for scraps and weakness that might mean their next meal.

Digital Edition

Image
Read the The Herts Advertiser e-edition E-edition
Zoo Watch CountryPhile

Newsletter Sign Up

Herts Advertiser weekly newsletter
Sign up to receive our regular email newsletter

Our Privacy Policy

Most read stories

Hot Jobs

Show Job Lists

Herts Most Wanted Herts Business Awards