Sandringham students win in Bank of England economic challenge regional heat

The winning Sandringham School Year 13 team from left: Edward Todd, James Winchester, Dan McGoohan,

The winning Sandringham School Year 13 team from left: Edward Todd, James Winchester, Dan McGoohan, Stephen Kerslake and Joseph Allen - Credit: Photo supplied

Robust responses in the face of tough questions from judges in a Bank of England competition have helped a St Albans secondary school win its regional heat.

A team from Sandringham School on The Ridgeway was placed first in the Luton heat of the bank’s prestigious ‘Target 2.0 Interest Rate Challenge’.

Students were competing last Tuesday (24) at the Putteridge Bury conference centre against other teams including one from St Albans High School for Girls.

The sixteenth annual challenge involves 297 teams across the United Kingdom vying for the challenge trophy and £5,000 for their school or college.

Over the course of 42 regional heats teams of students, aged 16-18, have been analysing UK and global economic data, and its possible impact on inflation and the economic outlook.


You may also want to watch:


They decide whether current monetary policy is appropriate or needs to be adjusted, to meet the 2.0 per cent inflation target set by the Government.

Sandringham’s team gave a 15 minute presentation to Bank of England judges, who praised the pupils for their understanding of economics, presentation style and ‘robust’ responses in the face of tough questioning.

Most Read

Chair of the judging panel, Phil Eckersley, described it as a “very tight contest”.

The team will now compete in the penultimate round of the contest in February before, hopefully, reaching the final in March.

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter
Comments powered by Disqus