St Albans schoolchildren learning the ropes with their own TV and radio stations

PUBLISHED: 16:03 03 January 2018 | UPDATED: 11:54 05 January 2018

The pupils running and operating the radio station at Southfield Schools Summer Fair. Photo: Sandridge School.

The pupils running and operating the radio station at Southfield Schools Summer Fair. Photo: Sandridge School.

Archant

The broadcasters of the future are trying their hand at running their own TV and radio stations.

Sandridge School pupils learning how to run a radio and TV station. Photo: Sandridge School.Sandridge School pupils learning how to run a radio and TV station. Photo: Sandridge School.

Sandridge School pupils have been producing news and interviews on key local issues for their internal channels.

Teacher Richard Sherwood said: “The original idea behind it was the previous headteacher wanted to use more technology on a cross-curricular way, and have different community links.

“So for English, the focus was on reading and speaking so they had to record their voices onto a microphone.

“For TV, the kids might have had to create a script for a 60 second advert which they then read out.”

Pupils are filming their interview and asking their questions to Alissa King-Underwood who is playing Alice in this Dick Whittington at Harpenden Public Halls. Photo: Sandridge School.Pupils are filming their interview and asking their questions to Alissa King-Underwood who is playing Alice in this Dick Whittington at Harpenden Public Halls. Photo: Sandridge School.

Mr Sherwood has been running both the TV and radio clubs since 2014.

Owing to immense popularity, the latter has to last three weeks so all 70 children can have a go.

Mr Sherwood said: “The kids are learning about different roles in radio, whether it’s a reporter or a presenter.

“In TV, they learn how to be camera operators or directors.”

The children visited the studios of Sky last February to combine their knowledge with experience of a real newsroom.

They then bring this practical knowledge to bear in their work, which has included a live broadcast from other local schools.

Mr Sherwood said: “It offers them the opportunity to build their confidence, their speaking and listening skills, and their teamworking skills.

“They get to learn technology they would not get to use, such as sound mixers, or professional camcorders.”

Pupils edit their own material together using professional computer applications such as Adobe Final Cut.

The results are then broadcast across the playground for radio, or uploaded online for TV.

From January to March, the TV club put together a news project on road safety and the environment, which was screened at the Sandpit Theatre.

For the project, the pupils asked questions to a police community support officer, with a focus on safety on Sandridge high street.

The next news project begins this month, and the results will be screened at the Sandpit in May.

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