Speed limit on Harpenden road ‘has absolutely no effect’ on drivers, residents claim

PUBLISHED: 07:30 27 September 2018

The 20 mile per hour speed limit on Cravells Road, Harpenden. Picture: DANNY LOO

The 20 mile per hour speed limit on Cravells Road, Harpenden. Picture: DANNY LOO

©2018 Danny Loo Photography - all rights reserved

The introduction of a 20mph speed limit on a road in Harpenden has met with concerns that it will not do enough to slow down traffic.

The 20 mile per hour speed limit on Cravells Road, Harpenden. Picture: DANNY LOOThe 20 mile per hour speed limit on Cravells Road, Harpenden. Picture: DANNY LOO

The speed limit was put in place in Cravells Road, as well as the surrounding roads, as part of ongoing efforts to improve the safety of the street.

Cravells Road has a one-way system between Eastmoor Park and the roundabout with Southdown Road, which has been ignored by some motorists. County councillor Teresa Heritage allocated £13,000 of her highways budget to help improve the road, which included installing bollards and holding a consultation on the 20mph limit.

Road resident Steve Gledhill said: “They included a 20mph speed limit on Cravells Road and one or two of the surrounding roads.

“I wondered if putting up the 20mph signs has really been of benefit. As far as I can see it just looks as if the cars are going down the road at the same speed as before. They don’t seem to be going any slower.

The 20 mile per hour speed limit on Cravells Road, Harpenden. Picture: DANNY LOOThe 20 mile per hour speed limit on Cravells Road, Harpenden. Picture: DANNY LOO

“I was in favour of it because its a very narrow road so ideally it needs some other traffic calming measures, but a speed limit is a start. I think what they should do in the short term is to enforce the 20mph and make sure people comply with it.”

Maxine Hayes, who lives in Loire Mews, said: “Personally I strongly dislike the new 20mph signage. I noticed it immediately and think it ruins the look of the area and is wholly unnecessary. I also believe it has absolutely no effect on drivers.”

Cravells Road resident Roger Dean agreed, stating that the majority of drivers ignore the speed restrictions. He said: “When the new limits were put in I hoped (perhaps not expected) the position would improve. It certainly has not; in fact I really believe it is worse.

“The way many people drive along our street is nothing less than an invasion of our right to quiet enjoyment. Drivers have a shameful disregard for safety and reasonable behaviour.”

Tom Sandham, who also lives in Cravells Road, said: “People consistently drive along Cravells Road at dangerous speeds. “There are many families with very young children on our street, and indeed pets. Despite everyone’s best attempts, it’s only a matter of time before a child strays into the road at a time when someone is driving too fast.

“It’s a narrow street and residents park all the way along it so speeding cars have no chance if someone steps out. A neighbour had a dog hit by a driver recently, so it’s happening and needs addressing.”

Cllr Teresa Heritage, who is councillor for Harpenden South West ward, said: “I am pleased that residents in the Cravells Road area are happy with the installation of the 20mph zone but I can also appreciate their concern that motorists are ignoring it.

“I am currently in discussion with highway officers about ways to increase the visibility of the zone and the potential for enforcement.”

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