Comment: From cats to crossbows, the unexpected things found by incoming homeowners

If your move is temporary then you may need to put some of your stuff into storage. Picture: Getty I

Be sure to pack carefully when making your next move... - Credit: Getty Images/iStockphoto

I receive all sorts of weird property-related press releases (and some even weirder ones that aren’t to do with property at all - top-quality yet competitively priced translation services, anyone?).  

A release that stood out this week concerned the funny things people have found on moving into their new home. In a study by Admiral Home Insurance, 39 per cent of movers reported finding unexpected items at their new place, including a cat, children’s teeth, an aircraft chassis and a crossbow. 

We’ve all been there (sort of). While I can’t compete with that lot, I have been surprised to find everything from a porn stash to an American style fridge freezer awaiting me at my new home. 

Removals firms say bulkier items are usually left behind by downsizers when they realise they won’t have space for them at their new place. Annoying/useful, depending on how you’re fixed yourself.  

While I don’t believe I’ve ever left behind anything quite as interesting as pets or teeth, I did cringe mightily when I realised I hadn’t binned the toilet brushes on leaving our last place.  


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According to removal teams quizzed by Admiral, £30,000 cash hidden in a wardrobe and a whisky stash under the floorboards are just two of the things that have almost been left behind by outgoing owners. 

Then there’s the stuff movers take even when they know they shouldn’t, with one in five admitting packing things that they should have left behind. Light bulbs and light fixtures were the most common items to be taken, followed by curtains and blinds.  

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Other, more unusual, things taken by outgoing residents include the TV aerial, sink plugs, doorbell, door handles, and the fitted kitchen (apart from the sink... which takes 'everything but the kitchen sink' to a new, very depressing, level).  

I was surprised to note it’s not just me that’s been left light on kitchen units - as I've noted here more than once, the people we bought from liked theirs so much they took most of them with them. The oversupply of white goods they gifted us more than made up for it, mind. 



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