Discordant note

SIR, — The other Tuesday at the St Albans Central Library while listening to Itsy Bitsy Spider Climbing up the Spout and wrestling with the complexities of modern technology in the nearby computer section, I was reminded of that other nursery rhyme Rid

SIR, - The other Tuesday at the St Albans Central Library while listening to "Itsy Bitsy Spider Climbing up the Spout" and wrestling with the complexities of modern technology in the nearby computer section, I was reminded of that other nursery rhyme "Ride a Cock Horse to Banbury Cross" which ends with the words "with rings on her fingers and bells on her toes, she shall have music wherever she goes". But this "she" doesn't always want it.

It seems to me that wherever you go now there is music to greet you. But is it always appropriate? Certainly the tinny tunes emanating from the earpiece of the man sitting at the next computer were not music to my ears - come to that neither were the business problems of the chap further along speaking into his mobile. Neither did I enjoy the strangulated screeching on offer at the local bar later or the throbbing tune provided by "my" Marks & Spencer as I tried to choose cheese.

"It brings in the young", the bright young things at Marketing Towers will say. "It drives out the old", this dull old thing will retort. Surely there can be a compromise. Quiet days from Monday to Thursday - except perhaps during the lunch period and going-home time when the young come out to play - and music on Friday to Sunday.

As for the library on Tuesday, well I can't hear myself think. Perhaps the local cemetery will offer sanctuary, a little bird song, the sound of a distant lawn mower - those quaint old sounds of yesteryear; but perhaps not - someone might strike up "Down Among the Dead Men".

ANNE WEIGHTMAN,

Riverside Road, St Albans.